Being environmentally responsible is more than eliminating plastic straws and other non-essential one-use plastic items. It also involves cleaning up our waterways and shorelines from past abuses. In fact, some cruisers want to book cruises to be able to participate in the types of excursions that leave a positive impact on the environment, rather than a negative impact. It seems to be the wave of the future.

For example, a very informative article on stuff.co.nz reports:

“Cruise ship passengers are lining up for “authentic, sustainable onshore experiences”, such as beach clean-ups and tree planting,”

Princess Cruises marketing manager Chloe Jones also commented in the article,

“Ecotourism isn’t just a trend any more, it’s a way of life for travellers now.”

Adam Armstrong, the managing director for Silversea Cruises  has also seen this trend increasing. He stated:

“In some ports, we have shore excursions that are environmentally themed. People go ashore and do environmental clean-ups…And those tours are generally oversubscribed. People want to go and help in some way, so there is a market for that.”

Waterways and beaches aren’t the only things that are a cause of concern when it comes to the cruise ship industry’s impact: seabirds have also had their share of troubles, particularly in New Zealand:

“Department of Conservation director general Lou Sanson called on the cruise industry to do more to protect seabirds, as they often flew into brightly-lit cruise ships at night. “We have more threatened seabirds in New Zealand than anywhere else on the planet … and more than a third of the world’s seabirds are in New Zealand.”

Whales are also negatively affected by cruise ships.

Auckland University marine ecology assistant professor Dr Rochelle Constantine suggests that

“cruise ships could explain to passengers why they were dimming the lights and turn it into a tourism activity.”

Dr. Constantine continues,

“You can say, ‘we’re slowing down because of the whales, and dimming the lights because of seabirds’, you make that decision and the tourists will follow. They don’t want any part of what they’re doing to be bad.”

To read the rest of this excellent article, go to:

stuff.co.nz

Photo by: Cathy Yeulet

Being environmentally responsible is more than eliminating plastic straws and other non-essential one-use plastic items. It also involves cleaning up our waterways and shorelines from past abuses. In fact, some cruisers want to book cruises to be able to participate in the types of excursions that leave a positive impact on the environment, rather than a negative impact. It seems to be the wave of the future.

For example, a very informative article on stuff.co.nz reports:

“Cruise ship passengers are lining up for “authentic, sustainable onshore experiences”, such as beach clean-ups and tree planting,”

Princess Cruises marketing manager Chloe Jones also commented in the article,

“Ecotourism isn’t just a trend any more, it’s a way of life for travellers now.”

Adam Armstrong, the managing director for Silversea Cruises  has also seen this trend increasing. He stated:

“In some ports, we have shore excursions that are environmentally themed. People go ashore and do environmental clean-ups…And those tours are generally oversubscribed. People want to go and help in some way, so there is a market for that.”

Waterways and beaches aren’t the only things that are a cause of concern when it comes to the cruise ship industry’s impact: seabirds have also had their share of troubles, particularly in New Zealand:

“Department of Conservation director general Lou Sanson called on the cruise industry to do more to protect seabirds, as they often flew into brightly-lit cruise ships at night. “We have more threatened seabirds in New Zealand than anywhere else on the planet … and more than a third of the world’s seabirds are in New Zealand.”

Whales are also negatively affected by cruise ships.

Auckland University marine ecology assistant professor Dr Rochelle Constantine suggests that

“cruise ships could explain to passengers why they were dimming the lights and turn it into a tourism activity.”

Dr. Constantine continues,

“You can say, ‘we’re slowing down because of the whales, and dimming the lights because of seabirds’, you make that decision and the tourists will follow. They don’t want any part of what they’re doing to be bad.”

To read the rest of this excellent article, go to:

stuff.co.nz

Photo by: Cathy Yeulet