What is Motion Sickness, aka Seasickness?

Motion sickness, or seasickness (also called mal de mer) is “caused by an imbalance  between the sensory parts of your body (eyes, ears, or sensory nerves) and the rest of your body,”  according to familydoctor.org.  For example, your eyes may be sending signals to your brain that things around you are moving, even though your body is not moving. This causes an imbalance between the two, which makes you feel ill.

Motion sickness can be triggered by riding in a car, plane, train, or on roller coasters and other amusement park rides. And of course, it can be triggered by riding on boats, whether large or small. The effects of motion sickness can range from mild nausea, headache, fatigue, and dizziness to, well…you know. The good news is that once the motion is over, the unpleasant symptoms should go away after your body and brain are back in sync.

About 30 percent of people don’t get motion sickness, claims James Locke, a flight surgeon and researcher at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. That’s great news for those who aren’t susceptible. But what can the other 70 percent do?

Be pro-active If you are worried you may become seasick, it’s better to be pro-active in the first place than to try to get over it later. Try some of the natural measures below to (hopefully) prevent or minimize the condition.

Sipping chamomile or peppermint tea may help (Photo:soyka / 123RF)

Try Natural Remedies

While there is no magic pill for seasickness, there are a few natural ideas you can try for mild to moderate forms of seasickness. The best part about these treatments is that they come without the side-effects that drugs can cause.

  • Drink small sips of chamomile tea. The chamomile can help settle your stomach, as well as relax your mind.
  • Sip peppermint tea, which also may be helpful to relieve nausea. Peppermint tablets are also available and you can take one tablet, two to three times a day. If you are familiar with aromatherapy, you can use peppermint essential oils as a treatment.
  • Wear an acupressure band. These are basically elastic wristbands that apply pressure to acupressure points and are said to help prevent or delay symptoms of motion sickness. Make sure you follow directions for proper placement.
  • Eat some dry saltine crackers and sip a carbonated beverage or sparkling water.
  • Take a swim in the ship’s pool.
  • Keep your eyes on the horizon if you’re in a moving boat, train, or car.
  • Don’t read or use an electronic device while in a car, boat, or plane.
  • Get fresh, cool air. Make your own breeze (fan yourself) if necessary.

Take Over-the-Counter Meds

Over-the-counter tablets, such as Bonine or Dramamine, may also offer some relief for motion sickness; however, if you are taking prescription drugs or are under a physician’s care for a medical condition, you should always check with him or her before taking any new medications, whether or not they are available over the counter. Unfortunately, these motion sickness products may cause unpleasant side-effects, such as drowsiness, dry mouth, or worse.

It’s important to stay hydrated. (Photo:chagin / 123RF)

Stay Hydrated

One very important thing to remember: If you are experiencing a long period of seasickness (with vomiting), be careful to drink enough fluids so you don’t become dehydrated. Sipping them slowly is the key so they don’t further aggravate the unpleasant situation.

The Good News Most ships today have stabilizers to lessen the rolling motion of the ship, which helps many people avoid feeling seasick; however, if you still find yourself feeling a bit nauseated, trying one or more of these ideas may help.

Selected portions of this article curated from draxe.com.

What is Motion Sickness, aka Seasickness?

Motion sickness, or seasickness (also called mal de mer) is “caused by an imbalance  between the sensory parts of your body (eyes, ears, or sensory nerves) and the rest of your body,”  according to familydoctor.org.  For example, your eyes may be sending signals to your brain that things around you are moving, even though your body is not moving. This causes an imbalance between the two, which makes you feel ill.

Motion sickness can be triggered by riding in a car, plane, train, or on roller coasters and other amusement park rides. And of course, it can be triggered by riding on boats, whether large or small. The effects of motion sickness can range from mild nausea, headache, fatigue, and dizziness to, well…you know. The good news is that once the motion is over, the unpleasant symptoms should go away after your body and brain are back in sync.

About 30 percent of people don’t get motion sickness, claims James Locke, a flight surgeon and researcher at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston. That’s great news for those who aren’t susceptible. But what can the other 70 percent do?

Be pro-active If you are worried you may become seasick, it’s better to be pro-active in the first place than to try to get over it later. Try some of the natural measures below to (hopefully) prevent or minimize the condition.

Sipping chamomile or peppermint tea may help (Photo:soyka / 123RF)

Try Natural Remedies

While there is no magic pill for seasickness, there are a few natural ideas you can try for mild to moderate forms of seasickness. The best part about these treatments is that they come without the side-effects that drugs can cause.

  • Drink small sips of chamomile tea. The chamomile can help settle your stomach, as well as relax your mind.
  • Sip peppermint tea, which also may be helpful to relieve nausea. Peppermint tablets are also available and you can take one tablet, two to three times a day. If you are familiar with aromatherapy, you can use peppermint essential oils as a treatment.
  • Wear an acupressure band. These are basically elastic wristbands that apply pressure to acupressure points and are said to help prevent or delay symptoms of motion sickness. Make sure you follow directions for proper placement.
  • Eat some dry saltine crackers and sip a carbonated beverage or sparkling water.
  • Take a swim in the ship’s pool.
  • Keep your eyes on the horizon if you’re in a moving boat, train, or car.
  • Don’t read or use an electronic device while in a car, boat, or plane.
  • Get fresh, cool air. Make your own breeze (fan yourself) if necessary.

Take Over-the-Counter Meds

Over-the-counter tablets, such as Bonine or Dramamine, may also offer some relief for motion sickness; however, if you are taking prescription drugs or are under a physician’s care for a medical condition, you should always check with him or her before taking any new medications, whether or not they are available over the counter. Unfortunately, these motion sickness products may cause unpleasant side-effects, such as drowsiness, dry mouth, or worse.

It’s important to stay hydrated. (Photo:chagin / 123RF)

Stay Hydrated

One very important thing to remember: If you are experiencing a long period of seasickness (with vomiting), be careful to drink enough fluids so you don’t become dehydrated. Sipping them slowly is the key so they don’t further aggravate the unpleasant situation.

The Good News Most ships today have stabilizers to lessen the rolling motion of the ship, which helps many people avoid feeling seasick; however, if you still find yourself feeling a bit nauseated, trying one or more of these ideas may help.

Selected portions of this article curated from draxe.com.