The word “muster” is a military term that means “to collect, or assemble,” as in “assemble the troops together.”

On a cruise ship, it simply means to assemble together for your safety drill. It’s also sometimes called a lifeboat drill or a boat drill on different vessels.

Laws that govern boats and ships (maritime law) require cruise ship passengers to attend a muster drill at the beginning of the cruise so they can learn what to do in case of an emergency—which lifeboat station to go to, how to use a life jacket, and to familiarize everyone with escape routes.

Cruise ships have conducted muster drills for years; however, the drills are now taken more seriously and are strictly enforced after the Costa Concordia disaster in January, 2012.

Muster drills are not generally required for shorter trips on the water, such as rides on ferries or dinner cruises; however, there may be an announcement about safety procedures over the PA system  just after these types of boats leave the dock.

The word “muster” is a military term that means “to collect, or assemble,” as in “assemble the troops together.”

On a cruise ship, it simply means to assemble together for your safety drill. It’s also sometimes called a lifeboat drill or a boat drill on different vessels.

Laws that govern boats and ships (maritime law) require cruise ship passengers to attend a muster drill at the beginning of the cruise so they can learn what to do in case of an emergency—which lifeboat station to go to, how to use a life jacket, and to familiarize everyone with escape routes.

Cruise ships have conducted muster drills for years; however, the drills are now taken more seriously and are strictly enforced after the Costa Concordia disaster in January, 2012.

Muster drills are not generally required for shorter trips on the water, such as rides on ferries or dinner cruises; however, there may be an announcement about safety procedures over the PA system  just after these types of boats leave the dock.