Saying No when there’s an opportunity to upgrade your cabin sounds crazy, doesn’t it? However, as tempting as a cabin upgrade may be, there are actually a few reasons why it may not be a smart idea.

Of course we all want something for free, or at least a lower price. Maybe you want to try a larger cabin that you wouldn’t normally be able to afford. These are great reasons to go ahead and grab that upgrade.

But there are actually legitimate reasons why you should not take a cabin upgrade when one is offered, as we discovered in an excellent Cruise Critic article. Here are what we think are the most important ones:

  • You have your heart set on a specific cabin location. Cruise Critic points out that:
When offered an upgrade, you usually cannot choose the location of your upgrade room or suite. If you prefer to stay midship on a lower deck to ease seasickness, have purposefully booked rooms near or connecting to travel companions or are picky about decks because you want to minimize noise, you should stick with the cabin you booked and not risk an upgrade.
  • You need a cabin that’s wheelchair accessible.
Cruise ships have limited wheelchair-friendly cabins and very few accessible suites. You can’t guarantee that an upgrade would be available in another accessible room, so if you need this type of cabin, book the one you want and say no to potential upgrades.
  • You think you’ll get all the perks that go with the cabin upgrade. Not true. The article clarifies:
Certain cruise lines (such as Norwegian, Seabourn and Oceania) offer special perks and freebies to passengers booked in their top suites, but don’t give all of those extras to travelers who get free or discounted upgrades from lower-tier cabins into the best suites
.
  • It costs too much. Cruise Critic offers this tip:
When a cruise line offers you an upsell, be sure to compare the new cruise fare (your original plus the upsell price) with the advertised fare for the upgraded cabin. You might find that the upgrade is not that good of a deal, or it will break your vacation budget. Just say no if what you’d pay in total for the better room is not a price you would’ve considered when you first booked your cruise vacation.

Cruise Critic offers more reasons why you should not book an upgrade: You’ll lose your perks, it’s not enough of an upgrade, and you might be concerned that once you do go with an upgraded cabin you’ll never want to go back to what you normally book.

You can read the rest of this very informative and helpful article at:

Cruise Critic

Photo by: Vladimir Sidorovich

Saying No when there’s an opportunity to upgrade your cabin sounds crazy, doesn’t it? However, as tempting as a cabin upgrade may be, there are actually a few reasons why it may not be a smart idea.

Of course we all want something for free, or at least a lower price. Maybe you want to try a larger cabin that you wouldn’t normally be able to afford. These are great reasons to go ahead and grab that upgrade.

But there are actually legitimate reasons why you should not take a cabin upgrade when one is offered, as we discovered in an excellent Cruise Critic article. Here are what we think are the most important ones:

  • You have your heart set on a specific cabin location. Cruise Critic points out that:
When offered an upgrade, you usually cannot choose the location of your upgrade room or suite. If you prefer to stay midship on a lower deck to ease seasickness, have purposefully booked rooms near or connecting to travel companions or are picky about decks because you want to minimize noise, you should stick with the cabin you booked and not risk an upgrade.
  • You need a cabin that’s wheelchair accessible.
Cruise ships have limited wheelchair-friendly cabins and very few accessible suites. You can’t guarantee that an upgrade would be available in another accessible room, so if you need this type of cabin, book the one you want and say no to potential upgrades.
  • You think you’ll get all the perks that go with the cabin upgrade. Not true. The article clarifies:
Certain cruise lines (such as Norwegian, Seabourn and Oceania) offer special perks and freebies to passengers booked in their top suites, but don’t give all of those extras to travelers who get free or discounted upgrades from lower-tier cabins into the best suites
.
  • It costs too much. Cruise Critic offers this tip:
When a cruise line offers you an upsell, be sure to compare the new cruise fare (your original plus the upsell price) with the advertised fare for the upgraded cabin. You might find that the upgrade is not that good of a deal, or it will break your vacation budget. Just say no if what you’d pay in total for the better room is not a price you would’ve considered when you first booked your cruise vacation.

Cruise Critic offers more reasons why you should not book an upgrade: You’ll lose your perks, it’s not enough of an upgrade, and you might be concerned that once you do go with an upgraded cabin you’ll never want to go back to what you normally book.

You can read the rest of this very informative and helpful article at:

Cruise Critic

Photo by: Vladimir Sidorovich